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Anheuser-Busch InBev Is One Step Closer To World Beer Market Domination

Anheuser-Busch InBev Is One Step Closer To World Beer Market Domination



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Anheuser-Busch InBev has pledged not to eliminate any jobs in South Africa following its takeover of SABMiller as part of an agreement designed to expedite the merger. The proposed merger will consolidate the production of one-third of the world’s beer into one major company.

The pact with South Africa's government was announced after markets closed Thursday. AB InBev also agreed to invest 1 billion rand ($68.8 million) to support small farmers, enterprise development and local manufacturing.

Budweiser's parent company also says it will work with the government to reduce the harmful use of alcohol throughout the country.

AB InBev CEO Carlos Brito says the agreement recognizes the former South African Breweries' "important contributions to South Africa's economy and society."

But the company still has a long way to go before completing the global $108-billion takeover deal with SABMiller that’s currently underway. South Africa is just one of many countries that has raised antitrust concerns around the merger.

In the U.S., AB InBev is adding to its growing roster of craft brands with the acquisition of Virginia-based brewery Devils Backbone Brewing Co. – which is one of the state’s largest and fastest growing beer makers. The company has won 28 awards at the Great American Beer Festival over the last seven years, reports USA Today.

"I am both very excited but humbled because (Devils Backbone co-founder and CEO) Steve (Crandall) and his team have built an amazing brewery, portfolio of beers and brands," Felipe Szpigel, President of Anheuser-Busch's The High End business unit that focuses on craft and unique import beers, told USA Today.

Since acquiring Chicago's Goose Island in 2011, AB InBev has now purchased eight U.S. craft breweries including Blue Point Brewing, Elysian Brewing and Colorado’s Breckenridge Brewery, marking a growing trend in the industry at large.

Devil’s Backbone says it will maintain a high level of autonomy after the acquisition but plans to use AB InBev’s "strategic knowledge and information and help” to expand operations and distribution. In 2015, they produced about 62,000 barrels of beer. The brewery expected to increase that to more than 90,000 this year.

After the deal with AB InBev is completed, Devils Backbone says it will add a 50,000-square foot expansion of the Outpost Brewery & Tap Room in Lexington, which includes an improved shipping and receiving facility and additional packaging automation. It will also upgrade facilities at the Roseland, Va., brewpub including permanent campsites and RV hookups.

In 2015, craft beer sales rose 16 percent to an estimated $22.3 billion, according to the latest data from the Brewers Association. The craft beer market now accounts for over 20 percent of all U.S. beer sales.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

This article was originally published on April 18, 2016


Competitive Intelligence

Interbrew shareholders approved the first in a series of resolutions enabling the deal, allowing Interbrew to give AmBev's controlling shareholders 141.7 million shares in the new company in return for their stake in the Brazilian brewer.

The deal, valued at about 8 billion euros ($9.66 billion), will close once AmBev shareholders give it their blessing at a meeting in Sao Paulo.

"The transaction creates a global platform for the combined group to develop its three global flagship brands, Brahma, a top-ten brand worldwide, and what we believe are the two fastest growing international brands, Stella Artois and Beck's,'' Interbrew said in a statement.

The deal allows Interbrew access to Latin America, where it had scant presence in the past. AmBev gains the opportunity to expand outside of the Americas.
European regulators have already approved the deal.

Although Brazil's main Cade anti-trust watchdog has yet to rule on it, its head has said it appeared to pose no competitive threat to rivals.

The approval was expected given that the controlling shareholders of Interbrew and AmBev created with the deal.

They will remain firmly in control of the new company and have equal representation on its 14-member board.

The free float, however, will fall to 26.2 percent from Interbrew's 35 percent and 23 percent at AmBev, also known as Companhia de Bebidas das Americas.

Interbrew Chief Executive John Brock will take on the same job at the new company, to be based in Leuven, Belgium, Interbrew's current headquarters.

Interbrew expects 280 million euros of annual cost savings.

Despite initial skepticism, investors have warmed to the deal, pushing Interbrew shares nearly 10 percent higher since the deal was first announced in March.

AmBev's preferred shares have slumped about 18 percent since early March but its common, or voting stock, has gained some 66 percent over the period.

Interbrew has said it would consider listing the new company on New York Stock Exchange in the next two years.

With the next six months, Interbrew will make a tender offer for AmBev's remaining voting shares at a cost of up to 1.4 billion euros.

Posted by Arik Johnson at September 5, 2004 01:03 PM | TrackBack

January 2006
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
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"Competitive Intelligence applies the lessons of competition and principles of intelligence to the need for every business to gain awareness and predictability of market risk and opportunity. By doing so, CI has the power to transform an enterprise from also-ran into a real winner, with agility enough to create and maintain sustainable competitive advantage."

Competitive Intelligence

Interbrew shareholders approved the first in a series of resolutions enabling the deal, allowing Interbrew to give AmBev's controlling shareholders 141.7 million shares in the new company in return for their stake in the Brazilian brewer.

The deal, valued at about 8 billion euros ($9.66 billion), will close once AmBev shareholders give it their blessing at a meeting in Sao Paulo.

"The transaction creates a global platform for the combined group to develop its three global flagship brands, Brahma, a top-ten brand worldwide, and what we believe are the two fastest growing international brands, Stella Artois and Beck's,'' Interbrew said in a statement.

The deal allows Interbrew access to Latin America, where it had scant presence in the past. AmBev gains the opportunity to expand outside of the Americas.
European regulators have already approved the deal.

Although Brazil's main Cade anti-trust watchdog has yet to rule on it, its head has said it appeared to pose no competitive threat to rivals.

The approval was expected given that the controlling shareholders of Interbrew and AmBev created with the deal.

They will remain firmly in control of the new company and have equal representation on its 14-member board.

The free float, however, will fall to 26.2 percent from Interbrew's 35 percent and 23 percent at AmBev, also known as Companhia de Bebidas das Americas.

Interbrew Chief Executive John Brock will take on the same job at the new company, to be based in Leuven, Belgium, Interbrew's current headquarters.

Interbrew expects 280 million euros of annual cost savings.

Despite initial skepticism, investors have warmed to the deal, pushing Interbrew shares nearly 10 percent higher since the deal was first announced in March.

AmBev's preferred shares have slumped about 18 percent since early March but its common, or voting stock, has gained some 66 percent over the period.

Interbrew has said it would consider listing the new company on New York Stock Exchange in the next two years.

With the next six months, Interbrew will make a tender offer for AmBev's remaining voting shares at a cost of up to 1.4 billion euros.

Posted by Arik Johnson at September 5, 2004 01:03 PM | TrackBack

January 2006
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
"Competitive Intelligence applies the lessons of competition and principles of intelligence to the need for every business to gain awareness and predictability of market risk and opportunity. By doing so, CI has the power to transform an enterprise from also-ran into a real winner, with agility enough to create and maintain sustainable competitive advantage."

Competitive Intelligence

Interbrew shareholders approved the first in a series of resolutions enabling the deal, allowing Interbrew to give AmBev's controlling shareholders 141.7 million shares in the new company in return for their stake in the Brazilian brewer.

The deal, valued at about 8 billion euros ($9.66 billion), will close once AmBev shareholders give it their blessing at a meeting in Sao Paulo.

"The transaction creates a global platform for the combined group to develop its three global flagship brands, Brahma, a top-ten brand worldwide, and what we believe are the two fastest growing international brands, Stella Artois and Beck's,'' Interbrew said in a statement.

The deal allows Interbrew access to Latin America, where it had scant presence in the past. AmBev gains the opportunity to expand outside of the Americas.
European regulators have already approved the deal.

Although Brazil's main Cade anti-trust watchdog has yet to rule on it, its head has said it appeared to pose no competitive threat to rivals.

The approval was expected given that the controlling shareholders of Interbrew and AmBev created with the deal.

They will remain firmly in control of the new company and have equal representation on its 14-member board.

The free float, however, will fall to 26.2 percent from Interbrew's 35 percent and 23 percent at AmBev, also known as Companhia de Bebidas das Americas.

Interbrew Chief Executive John Brock will take on the same job at the new company, to be based in Leuven, Belgium, Interbrew's current headquarters.

Interbrew expects 280 million euros of annual cost savings.

Despite initial skepticism, investors have warmed to the deal, pushing Interbrew shares nearly 10 percent higher since the deal was first announced in March.

AmBev's preferred shares have slumped about 18 percent since early March but its common, or voting stock, has gained some 66 percent over the period.

Interbrew has said it would consider listing the new company on New York Stock Exchange in the next two years.

With the next six months, Interbrew will make a tender offer for AmBev's remaining voting shares at a cost of up to 1.4 billion euros.

Posted by Arik Johnson at September 5, 2004 01:03 PM | TrackBack

January 2006
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
"Competitive Intelligence applies the lessons of competition and principles of intelligence to the need for every business to gain awareness and predictability of market risk and opportunity. By doing so, CI has the power to transform an enterprise from also-ran into a real winner, with agility enough to create and maintain sustainable competitive advantage."

Competitive Intelligence

Interbrew shareholders approved the first in a series of resolutions enabling the deal, allowing Interbrew to give AmBev's controlling shareholders 141.7 million shares in the new company in return for their stake in the Brazilian brewer.

The deal, valued at about 8 billion euros ($9.66 billion), will close once AmBev shareholders give it their blessing at a meeting in Sao Paulo.

"The transaction creates a global platform for the combined group to develop its three global flagship brands, Brahma, a top-ten brand worldwide, and what we believe are the two fastest growing international brands, Stella Artois and Beck's,'' Interbrew said in a statement.

The deal allows Interbrew access to Latin America, where it had scant presence in the past. AmBev gains the opportunity to expand outside of the Americas.
European regulators have already approved the deal.

Although Brazil's main Cade anti-trust watchdog has yet to rule on it, its head has said it appeared to pose no competitive threat to rivals.

The approval was expected given that the controlling shareholders of Interbrew and AmBev created with the deal.

They will remain firmly in control of the new company and have equal representation on its 14-member board.

The free float, however, will fall to 26.2 percent from Interbrew's 35 percent and 23 percent at AmBev, also known as Companhia de Bebidas das Americas.

Interbrew Chief Executive John Brock will take on the same job at the new company, to be based in Leuven, Belgium, Interbrew's current headquarters.

Interbrew expects 280 million euros of annual cost savings.

Despite initial skepticism, investors have warmed to the deal, pushing Interbrew shares nearly 10 percent higher since the deal was first announced in March.

AmBev's preferred shares have slumped about 18 percent since early March but its common, or voting stock, has gained some 66 percent over the period.

Interbrew has said it would consider listing the new company on New York Stock Exchange in the next two years.

With the next six months, Interbrew will make a tender offer for AmBev's remaining voting shares at a cost of up to 1.4 billion euros.

Posted by Arik Johnson at September 5, 2004 01:03 PM | TrackBack

January 2006
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
"Competitive Intelligence applies the lessons of competition and principles of intelligence to the need for every business to gain awareness and predictability of market risk and opportunity. By doing so, CI has the power to transform an enterprise from also-ran into a real winner, with agility enough to create and maintain sustainable competitive advantage."

Competitive Intelligence

Interbrew shareholders approved the first in a series of resolutions enabling the deal, allowing Interbrew to give AmBev's controlling shareholders 141.7 million shares in the new company in return for their stake in the Brazilian brewer.

The deal, valued at about 8 billion euros ($9.66 billion), will close once AmBev shareholders give it their blessing at a meeting in Sao Paulo.

"The transaction creates a global platform for the combined group to develop its three global flagship brands, Brahma, a top-ten brand worldwide, and what we believe are the two fastest growing international brands, Stella Artois and Beck's,'' Interbrew said in a statement.

The deal allows Interbrew access to Latin America, where it had scant presence in the past. AmBev gains the opportunity to expand outside of the Americas.
European regulators have already approved the deal.

Although Brazil's main Cade anti-trust watchdog has yet to rule on it, its head has said it appeared to pose no competitive threat to rivals.

The approval was expected given that the controlling shareholders of Interbrew and AmBev created with the deal.

They will remain firmly in control of the new company and have equal representation on its 14-member board.

The free float, however, will fall to 26.2 percent from Interbrew's 35 percent and 23 percent at AmBev, also known as Companhia de Bebidas das Americas.

Interbrew Chief Executive John Brock will take on the same job at the new company, to be based in Leuven, Belgium, Interbrew's current headquarters.

Interbrew expects 280 million euros of annual cost savings.

Despite initial skepticism, investors have warmed to the deal, pushing Interbrew shares nearly 10 percent higher since the deal was first announced in March.

AmBev's preferred shares have slumped about 18 percent since early March but its common, or voting stock, has gained some 66 percent over the period.

Interbrew has said it would consider listing the new company on New York Stock Exchange in the next two years.

With the next six months, Interbrew will make a tender offer for AmBev's remaining voting shares at a cost of up to 1.4 billion euros.

Posted by Arik Johnson at September 5, 2004 01:03 PM | TrackBack

January 2006
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
"Competitive Intelligence applies the lessons of competition and principles of intelligence to the need for every business to gain awareness and predictability of market risk and opportunity. By doing so, CI has the power to transform an enterprise from also-ran into a real winner, with agility enough to create and maintain sustainable competitive advantage."

Competitive Intelligence

Interbrew shareholders approved the first in a series of resolutions enabling the deal, allowing Interbrew to give AmBev's controlling shareholders 141.7 million shares in the new company in return for their stake in the Brazilian brewer.

The deal, valued at about 8 billion euros ($9.66 billion), will close once AmBev shareholders give it their blessing at a meeting in Sao Paulo.

"The transaction creates a global platform for the combined group to develop its three global flagship brands, Brahma, a top-ten brand worldwide, and what we believe are the two fastest growing international brands, Stella Artois and Beck's,'' Interbrew said in a statement.

The deal allows Interbrew access to Latin America, where it had scant presence in the past. AmBev gains the opportunity to expand outside of the Americas.
European regulators have already approved the deal.

Although Brazil's main Cade anti-trust watchdog has yet to rule on it, its head has said it appeared to pose no competitive threat to rivals.

The approval was expected given that the controlling shareholders of Interbrew and AmBev created with the deal.

They will remain firmly in control of the new company and have equal representation on its 14-member board.

The free float, however, will fall to 26.2 percent from Interbrew's 35 percent and 23 percent at AmBev, also known as Companhia de Bebidas das Americas.

Interbrew Chief Executive John Brock will take on the same job at the new company, to be based in Leuven, Belgium, Interbrew's current headquarters.

Interbrew expects 280 million euros of annual cost savings.

Despite initial skepticism, investors have warmed to the deal, pushing Interbrew shares nearly 10 percent higher since the deal was first announced in March.

AmBev's preferred shares have slumped about 18 percent since early March but its common, or voting stock, has gained some 66 percent over the period.

Interbrew has said it would consider listing the new company on New York Stock Exchange in the next two years.

With the next six months, Interbrew will make a tender offer for AmBev's remaining voting shares at a cost of up to 1.4 billion euros.

Posted by Arik Johnson at September 5, 2004 01:03 PM | TrackBack

January 2006
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
"Competitive Intelligence applies the lessons of competition and principles of intelligence to the need for every business to gain awareness and predictability of market risk and opportunity. By doing so, CI has the power to transform an enterprise from also-ran into a real winner, with agility enough to create and maintain sustainable competitive advantage."

Competitive Intelligence

Interbrew shareholders approved the first in a series of resolutions enabling the deal, allowing Interbrew to give AmBev's controlling shareholders 141.7 million shares in the new company in return for their stake in the Brazilian brewer.

The deal, valued at about 8 billion euros ($9.66 billion), will close once AmBev shareholders give it their blessing at a meeting in Sao Paulo.

"The transaction creates a global platform for the combined group to develop its three global flagship brands, Brahma, a top-ten brand worldwide, and what we believe are the two fastest growing international brands, Stella Artois and Beck's,'' Interbrew said in a statement.

The deal allows Interbrew access to Latin America, where it had scant presence in the past. AmBev gains the opportunity to expand outside of the Americas.
European regulators have already approved the deal.

Although Brazil's main Cade anti-trust watchdog has yet to rule on it, its head has said it appeared to pose no competitive threat to rivals.

The approval was expected given that the controlling shareholders of Interbrew and AmBev created with the deal.

They will remain firmly in control of the new company and have equal representation on its 14-member board.

The free float, however, will fall to 26.2 percent from Interbrew's 35 percent and 23 percent at AmBev, also known as Companhia de Bebidas das Americas.

Interbrew Chief Executive John Brock will take on the same job at the new company, to be based in Leuven, Belgium, Interbrew's current headquarters.

Interbrew expects 280 million euros of annual cost savings.

Despite initial skepticism, investors have warmed to the deal, pushing Interbrew shares nearly 10 percent higher since the deal was first announced in March.

AmBev's preferred shares have slumped about 18 percent since early March but its common, or voting stock, has gained some 66 percent over the period.

Interbrew has said it would consider listing the new company on New York Stock Exchange in the next two years.

With the next six months, Interbrew will make a tender offer for AmBev's remaining voting shares at a cost of up to 1.4 billion euros.

Posted by Arik Johnson at September 5, 2004 01:03 PM | TrackBack

January 2006
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
"Competitive Intelligence applies the lessons of competition and principles of intelligence to the need for every business to gain awareness and predictability of market risk and opportunity. By doing so, CI has the power to transform an enterprise from also-ran into a real winner, with agility enough to create and maintain sustainable competitive advantage."

Competitive Intelligence

Interbrew shareholders approved the first in a series of resolutions enabling the deal, allowing Interbrew to give AmBev's controlling shareholders 141.7 million shares in the new company in return for their stake in the Brazilian brewer.

The deal, valued at about 8 billion euros ($9.66 billion), will close once AmBev shareholders give it their blessing at a meeting in Sao Paulo.

"The transaction creates a global platform for the combined group to develop its three global flagship brands, Brahma, a top-ten brand worldwide, and what we believe are the two fastest growing international brands, Stella Artois and Beck's,'' Interbrew said in a statement.

The deal allows Interbrew access to Latin America, where it had scant presence in the past. AmBev gains the opportunity to expand outside of the Americas.
European regulators have already approved the deal.

Although Brazil's main Cade anti-trust watchdog has yet to rule on it, its head has said it appeared to pose no competitive threat to rivals.

The approval was expected given that the controlling shareholders of Interbrew and AmBev created with the deal.

They will remain firmly in control of the new company and have equal representation on its 14-member board.

The free float, however, will fall to 26.2 percent from Interbrew's 35 percent and 23 percent at AmBev, also known as Companhia de Bebidas das Americas.

Interbrew Chief Executive John Brock will take on the same job at the new company, to be based in Leuven, Belgium, Interbrew's current headquarters.

Interbrew expects 280 million euros of annual cost savings.

Despite initial skepticism, investors have warmed to the deal, pushing Interbrew shares nearly 10 percent higher since the deal was first announced in March.

AmBev's preferred shares have slumped about 18 percent since early March but its common, or voting stock, has gained some 66 percent over the period.

Interbrew has said it would consider listing the new company on New York Stock Exchange in the next two years.

With the next six months, Interbrew will make a tender offer for AmBev's remaining voting shares at a cost of up to 1.4 billion euros.

Posted by Arik Johnson at September 5, 2004 01:03 PM | TrackBack

January 2006
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
"Competitive Intelligence applies the lessons of competition and principles of intelligence to the need for every business to gain awareness and predictability of market risk and opportunity. By doing so, CI has the power to transform an enterprise from also-ran into a real winner, with agility enough to create and maintain sustainable competitive advantage."

Competitive Intelligence

Interbrew shareholders approved the first in a series of resolutions enabling the deal, allowing Interbrew to give AmBev's controlling shareholders 141.7 million shares in the new company in return for their stake in the Brazilian brewer.

The deal, valued at about 8 billion euros ($9.66 billion), will close once AmBev shareholders give it their blessing at a meeting in Sao Paulo.

"The transaction creates a global platform for the combined group to develop its three global flagship brands, Brahma, a top-ten brand worldwide, and what we believe are the two fastest growing international brands, Stella Artois and Beck's,'' Interbrew said in a statement.

The deal allows Interbrew access to Latin America, where it had scant presence in the past. AmBev gains the opportunity to expand outside of the Americas.
European regulators have already approved the deal.

Although Brazil's main Cade anti-trust watchdog has yet to rule on it, its head has said it appeared to pose no competitive threat to rivals.

The approval was expected given that the controlling shareholders of Interbrew and AmBev created with the deal.

They will remain firmly in control of the new company and have equal representation on its 14-member board.

The free float, however, will fall to 26.2 percent from Interbrew's 35 percent and 23 percent at AmBev, also known as Companhia de Bebidas das Americas.

Interbrew Chief Executive John Brock will take on the same job at the new company, to be based in Leuven, Belgium, Interbrew's current headquarters.

Interbrew expects 280 million euros of annual cost savings.

Despite initial skepticism, investors have warmed to the deal, pushing Interbrew shares nearly 10 percent higher since the deal was first announced in March.

AmBev's preferred shares have slumped about 18 percent since early March but its common, or voting stock, has gained some 66 percent over the period.

Interbrew has said it would consider listing the new company on New York Stock Exchange in the next two years.

With the next six months, Interbrew will make a tender offer for AmBev's remaining voting shares at a cost of up to 1.4 billion euros.

Posted by Arik Johnson at September 5, 2004 01:03 PM | TrackBack

January 2006
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
"Competitive Intelligence applies the lessons of competition and principles of intelligence to the need for every business to gain awareness and predictability of market risk and opportunity. By doing so, CI has the power to transform an enterprise from also-ran into a real winner, with agility enough to create and maintain sustainable competitive advantage."

Competitive Intelligence

Interbrew shareholders approved the first in a series of resolutions enabling the deal, allowing Interbrew to give AmBev's controlling shareholders 141.7 million shares in the new company in return for their stake in the Brazilian brewer.

The deal, valued at about 8 billion euros ($9.66 billion), will close once AmBev shareholders give it their blessing at a meeting in Sao Paulo.

"The transaction creates a global platform for the combined group to develop its three global flagship brands, Brahma, a top-ten brand worldwide, and what we believe are the two fastest growing international brands, Stella Artois and Beck's,'' Interbrew said in a statement.

The deal allows Interbrew access to Latin America, where it had scant presence in the past. AmBev gains the opportunity to expand outside of the Americas.
European regulators have already approved the deal.

Although Brazil's main Cade anti-trust watchdog has yet to rule on it, its head has said it appeared to pose no competitive threat to rivals.

The approval was expected given that the controlling shareholders of Interbrew and AmBev created with the deal.

They will remain firmly in control of the new company and have equal representation on its 14-member board.

The free float, however, will fall to 26.2 percent from Interbrew's 35 percent and 23 percent at AmBev, also known as Companhia de Bebidas das Americas.

Interbrew Chief Executive John Brock will take on the same job at the new company, to be based in Leuven, Belgium, Interbrew's current headquarters.

Interbrew expects 280 million euros of annual cost savings.

Despite initial skepticism, investors have warmed to the deal, pushing Interbrew shares nearly 10 percent higher since the deal was first announced in March.

AmBev's preferred shares have slumped about 18 percent since early March but its common, or voting stock, has gained some 66 percent over the period.

Interbrew has said it would consider listing the new company on New York Stock Exchange in the next two years.

With the next six months, Interbrew will make a tender offer for AmBev's remaining voting shares at a cost of up to 1.4 billion euros.

Posted by Arik Johnson at September 5, 2004 01:03 PM | TrackBack

January 2006
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
"Competitive Intelligence applies the lessons of competition and principles of intelligence to the need for every business to gain awareness and predictability of market risk and opportunity. By doing so, CI has the power to transform an enterprise from also-ran into a real winner, with agility enough to create and maintain sustainable competitive advantage."


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