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Grilled Pitas with Tomatoes, Olives, and Feta

Grilled Pitas with Tomatoes, Olives, and Feta


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Ingredients

  • 1 cup diced seeded plum tomatoes (about 4)
  • 1/2 cup pitted coarsely chopped mixed olives
  • 1/2 cup chopped red onion
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh mint
  • 4 whole wheat pita breads
  • 1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese (about 3 ounces)

Recipe Preparation

  • Prepare barbecue (medium-high heat). Stir tomatoes, olives, onion, 2 tablespoons oil, and mint in small bowl to blend.

  • Brush 1 side of each pita with remaining 2 tablespoons oil; place pitas, oiled side down, on grill. Cook until lightly charred, about 2 minutes. Turn pitas over; top with tomato mixture, spreading almost to edges. Sprinkle with cheese.

  • Cover barbecue and grill pitas until topping is warm, about 2 minutes. Transfer pitas to plates and serve.

Recipe by Brooke Dojny, Melanie Barnard,Photos by Michael FalconerReviews Section

This Flavorful Spin on Gyros Uses Impossible Meat

Barbecue season is well upon us, but for those who stick to a plant-based diet or are trying to cut back on meat often search for grill alternatives—that aren’t simply just veggie burgers. And for those who rely on plant-based meats—like Beyond Burger and meat-free sausages —there’s a new cookbook that’s likely to provide plenty of inspiration: “Impossible: The Cookbook.” For every purchase of the cookbook, which is only available on Amazon, $3 will be donated to No Kid Hungry.

Helmed by the same team who designed the Impossible Burger, this cookbook not only aims to save the planet by limiting humans’ meat consumption, but also provides a slew of recipes, developed by a cohort of chefs, that repurpose plant-based meat. Many of the recipes are traditional meat dishes that have been transformed into vegetarian and plant-based versions, swapping beef for Impossible meat.

Impossible™: The Cookbook: How to Save Our Planet, One Delicious Meal at a Time, $26.99 on Amazon

Flip through the pages to find meat-free versions of lomo saltado , a Peruvian dish tossed with spiced meat, french fries, peppers, and rice. Or you could opt for swapping your go-to burger with a recipe for chef Traci des Jardins’ Impossible burger—which was developed at her now-shuttered San Francisco restaurant Jardinière—a strapping contraption of cheese, lettuce, smashed avocados, and “beef,” all pressed together between two plush hamburger buns.

OXO Good Grips 2-Piece Grilling Set, $19.99 on Amazon

Ahead, a summery recipe for gyros with Greek salad, tzatziki, and grilled pitas. The Impossible meat gets seasoned with oregano, dried marjoram, dried thyme, and garlic powder, then thrown on the grill and cooked just like a regular burger. The cooked patties are tossed on top of a Greek salad (rather than thinly sliced as traditional gyros often are), rife with cherry tomatoes, cucumbers, onions, olives, and feta cheese, then drizzled with tzatziki sauce. Serve it alongside grilled pitas—either prepped for mopping up tzatziki or as a vehicle for the salad and beef, gyro style.

Gyros with Greek Salad, Tzatziki, and Grilled Pitas Recipe

Even though he’s Irish American, this is one of chef Douglas Keane’s favorite childhood comfort foods, because he grew up in Detroit, where gyros are a Greektown staple. “I still love a good old-style gyro,” he says, “but I have to say, I like this version even better. It’s moister and fresher tasting than the usual smashed, seared, and sliced gyro meat.” Rather than blending in seasonings, Douglas likes to treat all ground meat (including the kind made from plants) with a light hand. So he forms unseasoned patties and sprinkles them with the seasoning just before cooking.


Grilled Flank Steak Pita Wraps

Grilled flank steak pita wraps are the perfect summer dinner recipe! They are loaded with fresh veggies and topped with a homemade Greek yogurt sauce! They are a must-make for a quick weeknight meal or a weekend picnic/dinner party!

Good morning, Belle of the Kitchen readers! I hope you are all having a wonderful summer! My name is Justine and I am the blogger over at Cooking and Beer, where I pair my favorite dishes with the best craft beer I can get my hands on. I was super excited when Ashlyn asked me to do a guest post for her. Her recipes are constantly making me hungry, so I obviously jumped at the chance to contribute!

I don&rsquot know about you guys, but I have basically been obsessed with grilling lately. You name it, I have probably grilled it. From sweet potatoes to chicken and eggplant to pork chops, I just can&rsquot get enough of standing next to a hot grill. These grilled flank steak pita wraps are one of my latest obsessions, and the reasons go above and beyond the grilled flank steak!

I think what I love most about these grilled flank steak pita wraps is the Mediterranean flare they have. They are kind of like a gyro, but not really. Oh sure, they have the cucumber, dill, and the Greek yogurt tzatziki-like sauce. All of the amazing fillings, like fresh tomatoes, are stuffed inside a pita pocket. Ok, so maybe they are exactly like many gyro recipes, but I like to think that this recipe has it&rsquos own special touches. The kalamata olives for one really sets these pita wraps apart and gives them super fun flavor! The addition of a thin layer of hummus on the inside of the pita really adds an extra element of deliciousness.

These pitas are seriously perfect for summer. They are jam packed with freshness, and the char on the flank steak can not be matched!

I hope you guys enjoy these grilled flank steak pita wraps as much as I enjoyed creating them for you!


This Flavorful Spin on Gyros Uses Impossible Meat

Barbecue season is well upon us, but for those who stick to a plant-based diet or are trying to cut back on meat often search for grill alternatives—that aren’t simply just veggie burgers. And for those who rely on plant-based meats—like Beyond Burger and meat-free sausages —there’s a new cookbook that’s likely to provide plenty of inspiration: “Impossible: The Cookbook.” For every purchase of the cookbook, which is only available on Amazon, $3 will be donated to No Kid Hungry.

Helmed by the same team who designed the Impossible Burger, this cookbook not only aims to save the planet by limiting humans’ meat consumption, but also provides a slew of recipes, developed by a cohort of chefs, that repurpose plant-based meat. Many of the recipes are traditional meat dishes that have been transformed into vegetarian and plant-based versions, swapping beef for Impossible meat.

Impossible™: The Cookbook: How to Save Our Planet, One Delicious Meal at a Time, $26.99 on Amazon

Flip through the pages to find meat-free versions of lomo saltado , a Peruvian dish tossed with spiced meat, french fries, peppers, and rice. Or you could opt for swapping your go-to burger with a recipe for chef Traci des Jardins’ Impossible burger—which was developed at her now-shuttered San Francisco restaurant Jardinière—a strapping contraption of cheese, lettuce, smashed avocados, and “beef,” all pressed together between two plush hamburger buns.

OXO Good Grips 2-Piece Grilling Set, $19.99 on Amazon

Ahead, a summery recipe for gyros with Greek salad, tzatziki, and grilled pitas. The Impossible meat gets seasoned with oregano, dried marjoram, dried thyme, and garlic powder, then thrown on the grill and cooked just like a regular burger. The cooked patties are tossed on top of a Greek salad (rather than thinly sliced as traditional gyros often are), rife with cherry tomatoes, cucumbers, onions, olives, and feta cheese, then drizzled with tzatziki sauce. Serve it alongside grilled pitas—either prepped for mopping up tzatziki or as a vehicle for the salad and beef, gyro style.

Gyros with Greek Salad, Tzatziki, and Grilled Pitas Recipe

Even though he’s Irish American, this is one of chef Douglas Keane’s favorite childhood comfort foods, because he grew up in Detroit, where gyros are a Greektown staple. “I still love a good old-style gyro,” he says, “but I have to say, I like this version even better. It’s moister and fresher tasting than the usual smashed, seared, and sliced gyro meat.” Rather than blending in seasonings, Douglas likes to treat all ground meat (including the kind made from plants) with a light hand. So he forms unseasoned patties and sprinkles them with the seasoning just before cooking.


I love grilled chicken pitas because you can make them a ton of different ways. Its simple to make them kid-friendly and get your kids involved by having them assemble their own pita. My kids love to help in the kitchen so this is a fun way to get them excited for dinner.

I love the brininess of olives and the tart taste of feta cheese, combine these with the creaminess of the yogurt sauce and cooling cucumber, and you have a hit recipe that is perfect for lunch or dinner. Serve these when guests com over for a fun Mediterranean themed get-together.


1. Prepare a grill or large grill pan for high heat. Whisk the lemon zest and juice, vinegar, honey, oregano and a pinch each of salt and pepper in a large bowl. Whisk in 1/2 cup of the oil in a slow, steady stream until emulsified.

2. Peel the cucumbers , leaving alternating strips of green peel. Trim the ends, halve the cucumbers lengthwise and slice them crosswise into 1/2-inch-thick slices. Add them to the bowl with the dressing. Add the chickpeas.

3. Brush the pitas on both sides with 2 tablespoons of the oil, and sprinkle liberally with salt and pepper. Thread 6 or 7 tomatoes on each skewer. (If using wooden skewers, leave just 1/2 inch sticking out on each end so you do not have to soak them.) Brush the remaining 2 tablespoons oil on the tomatoes and the onions, and sprinkle liberally with salt and pepper.

4. Place the pitas, skewered tomatoes and onions on the grill. Grill the pitas, flipping and rotating frequently, until charred in spots on both sides and crispy, 4 to 5 minutes. Grill the onions, turning as needed, until charred and tender, 6 to 8 minutes. Grill the tomatoes, turning occasionally, until lightly charred in spots and starting to burst, 6 to 8 minutes. Transfer the pitas and vegetables to a large cutting board when done cooking.

5. When cool enough to handle, cut the pitas into 1-inch pieces and roughly chop the onions into bite-size pieces. Add them to the bowl with the cucumbers, chickpeas and dressing. Add the tomatoes, feta, kalamata olives and dill. Gently toss to combine. Season with salt and pepper if needed. (Be careful with seasoning at this point, because the feta and olives are very salty.) Let the salad sit at room temperature for at least 15 minutes before serving, drizzled with olive oil.


Greek Chicken Pita with Whipped Feta

This Greek Chicken Pita with Whipped Feta is a quick, easy, and healthy Mediterranean inspired meal! Tender chicken meatballs are studded with onion, garlic, and plenty of spices and nestled on to warm pieces of pita smothered in a delicious whipped feta spread.

Keyword greek chicken pita, greek meatballs, chicken meatballs

Ingredients

  • 1 lb ground chicken breast
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/2 cup panko breadcrumbs
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 2 tsp finely chopped fresh rosemary
  • 2 large garlic cloves, grated
  • 1/2 tsp dried oregano
  • 1 small onion, divided
  • 4 oz feta
  • 1 oz light cream cheese
  • 2 tbsp plain Greek yogurt
  • 1 1/2 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1/4 tsp onion powder
  • 1/2 tsp dried dill
  • 1 large cucumber
  • 1/4 medium red onion, thinly sliced
  • 6 whole-wheat pitas

Instructions

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Line a large baking sheet with parchement paper.

Add chicken, egg, breadcrumbs, garlic, salt, rosemary and dried oregano to a medium bowl. Grate 3/4 of the onion into the bowl and then finely chop the remaining 1/4 of the onion and add it to the bowl as well. Use your hands to mix the ingredients just until they are combined.

Use a small cookie spoon to form the chicken into meatballs. Wet hands with cold water and roll into a perfect ball. Place on the prepare baking sheet. Bake for 10-12 minutes until golden brown and cooked through.

While the meatballs cook, make the whipped feta. Add the feta, cream cheese, Greek yogurt, lemon juice, onion powder, and dill to a food processor. Pulse until smooth and whipped. Season with salt and pepper. Pulse one more time.

Use a vegetable peeler to shave the cucumber into thinly sliced pieces. To assemble, spread the whipped feta on the bottom of each pita. Top with shaved cucumber and red onion. Place chicken meatballs on top.


Grilled Greek Pita Pizzas

I love lamb. I was raised enjoying lamb for special occasion dinners and it brings back some of my most cherished memories of my childhood. Not only is lamb delicious and full of flavor, but it packs a pretty impressive nutritional punch! Lamb is an excellent source of B12, niacin, zinc and selenium. A 3-ounce serving of lamb provides 3 grams of heart healthy monounsaturated fat. It’s a responsible choice you can feel good about enjoying.

Plus choosing American lamb means you are supporting local family farmers and ranchers. Did you know there are over 80,000 family-owned sheep farms and ranches in the United States and lamb is produced in every state? Eating locally sourced ingredients is something I am becoming more and more passionate about, especially when it comes to our source of protein. Quality counts friends.

I also love pizza. Homemade dough can be a labor of love. So, when I’m short on time… I reach for fresh pitas and pile them high with our favorite toppings. Since this is a Greek inspired pizza a pita just made sense!! Right?

I always have a platter piled high with fresh chopped veggies on pizza night to give my kids the option top choose what they put on their pizzas. Nine times out of ten they load up on extra veggies unintentionally! Mom win!

What ingredients are in Greek Pita pizzas

  • pita rounds (I like Papa Pita)
  • classic hummus (homemade or store bought will do)
  • ground American Lamb
  • kalamata olives
  • cucumbers
  • tomatoes
  • red onion
  • banana peppers
  • feta cheese
  • spices
  • tzatziki dressing (we like Culinary Tours)

I think I could easily live off the flavors in this dish. My body never seems to tire of the salty and fresh combo. The unique flavor of lamb really brings a delicious addition. If you’re family is still learning to love lamb, you could easily sub ground beef (I’ll even do a 50/50 blend) or grilled chicken with the same spices in this recipe.

If you’re looking for new ways to introduce your family to the tasty world of lamb, this recipe is a great place to start. I would almost bet that your family won’t even notice a difference if you don’t mention it. Mine never does. They devour these in minutes and come back for seconds which doesn’t leave me leftovers… sadly.


Mediterranean Mezze Platter

Subscribe and get Turkey Schmurkey, my plant-based holiday eCookbook, for FREE!

It’s been awhile since I featured a quick and easy meal (see: hamburgers/veggie burgers, bratwursts/Field Roast, taco salads …) – so I thought it was time I shared another favorite easy dinner for our mixed carnivore/vegetarian household: The mezze platter!

Mezze is essentially a variety of Middle Eastern appetizers – several items served up small-plate style. Ours generally include veggies, pitas, hummus, olives, and a variety of other Mediterranean goodies.

We find mezze platters the perfect dinner around here because it’s super easy to pick and choose your food. The carnivores grab some meat, the vegetarian (me) does not. And then the vegetarian (me) grabs extra olives. Because: olives!

Mezze platters make a terrific party spread, too, especially when you’re going to be serving folks with a variety of dietary preferences or restrictions.

Another thing I like about them? You can buy everything at the store! As much as I love making stuff from scratch, it’s not always realistic. Mezze platters can be as easy as visiting the olive bar and deli section at your local grocery store, then getting home, opening a few containers, and slicing up a few things. No cooking, no massive prep. Easy, delicious.

To make your own platter, just mix and match foods to your liking. Here are some ideas to get you started. This is by no means a complete list, by the way – nor is it faithful to any particular cuisine’s version of meze. It’s just a bunch of good stuff, that together makes a great – and easy – dinner!


Grilled chicken pitas

Combine 3 tablespoons lemon juice, soy sauce, garlic and 1 teaspoon of the oregano in a glass dish.

Add the chicken, turn to coat, and cover with plastic wrap.

Allow the chicken breast to marinate for 30 minutes at room temperature or overnight in the refrigerator.

Combine the tomatoes and feta cheese in a small glass dish.

Add the remaining 2 teaspoons lemon juice, the olive oil, and the remaining 1 teaspoon oregano, and stir to combine.

Allow to sit at room temperature for 30 minutes.

For the yogurt sauce: In a small bowl, whisk together the yogurt, garlic, walnuts, and olive oil.

Cover and refrigerate until ready to use.

Preheat a grill to medium heat.

Spray a grill basket with olive oil.

Grill the chicken breasts over medium heat for 8 to 10 minutes, until no longer pink in the thickest portion of each breast.

Spread the onion rings over the surface of the basket and grill while the chicken is cooking.

Turn the basket frequently.

The onion rings will blacken as they cook this will also take 8 to 10 minutes.

When the chicken and onion rings are cooked, place the pita breads on the grill for about 2 minutes per side, until grill marks show.

Slice the chicken into very thin pieces.

At serving time, put out all of the ingredients and allow each person to assemble sandwiches: Split each pita.

Place several slices of grilled chicken, 3 or 4 slivers of onion, a tablespoon of tomato-feta mixture, lettuce, olives, and 1 or 2 slices of bacon into each pita.



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